Productivity is for People Who Don’t Love What They Do

There is a whole industry around productivity tools, tips, tricks etc. The funny thing I found is that people who love what they do and are really, really good at their art, don’t need any of those things. They do their art. The thinking and planning time is done to support them in doing their art, it’s not a category of task in itself.

We’re using the Seth Godin definition of art.

“Art isn’t only a painting. Art is anything that’s creative, passionate, and personal. And great art resonates with the viewer, not only with the creator.

An artists is someone who uses bravery, insight, creativity, and boldness to challenge the status quo. And an artists takes it personally.

Art is a personal gift that changes the recipient. The medium doesn’t matter. The intent does.

Art is a personal act of courage, something one human does that creates change in another.”

If you love what you do, you jump out of bed and dig in wholeheartedly

You don’t have to trick yourself into working. You don’t need tools, lists, motivational talks or pumping up routines. When you love what you do you get other things out of the way so you can work on your art.

You know what the most important things are to do to move your project ahead and you get to it

Whether it is a painting, a renovation, displaying your wares or building a business, you know where you are going with it, you have a process to get there and you execute. As you build mastery with your art, you spend less time with planning and more with doing.

You don’t get mired in the day to day. Those tasks feel like distractions, like necessary bits to get out of the way so you can get to the real work of building or doing what you love.

You have a better dialogue with your lizard brain.

Your lizard brain is stronger when you aren’t committed to what you are doing. When you are committed and excited, whispers of disaster are more likely to make you smile than to make you fearful.

Your lizard brain has a role to play, but if you listen too much, it will stop you from doing anything new. You tame your Lizard brain by listening, thanking and patting it on the head and doing what you want to do anyway.

When you do your art, you tap into something bigger than you

In her TED talk, Elizabeth Gilbert described how genies or genius comes from outside of us. When you are deep into making your art, you feel the touch of that genius as ideas and abilities come from seemingly nowhere to manifest in what you are doing.

What a relief! It means that if you do great things, you can only take credit for channeling the genius and if you flop, well, your genius was being a bit lame that day.

Tapping into the genius, is a magical feeling. It feels like running with the wind. What you do is better than the effort you put into it.

Until you get to that point, it can feel more like a slog. You have to practice your art with deliberation and mindfulness until you reach mastery for your genius to be there reliably. Is that what beginner’s luck is? We are open to the genius when we try something? But then we get deeper into our head and focus on the mechanics until we have them mastered. Then the we let the genius in again. Hmm, interesting thoughts.

When you love what you do, you go with the Flow

You know that feeling when time stand still and you lose yourself in what you are doing? I’ve experienced it playing volleyball and managed to make moves that shouldn’t have been possible.

I definitely experience it when doing bookkeeping (don’t judge me). The numbers begin to dance with a movement that is both logical and beautiful. It’s why bookkeeping and any other task that means interruption, such as reception don’t mix. Just sayin’.

I like writing, I like it a lot.

The writing itself for me is a means to an end. I’m highly motivated to write when I have something I feel I have to say, or I’m writing to work through some thinking. My book, Your Effortless Business began as a writing exercise to puzzle through why business seems to be so hard when it’s really just about buying and selling what other people need or want. Business isn’t hard in the same ways all over the world, which led me to think it isn’t inherently hard. Writing it out helped me clarify that thinking.

I didn’t need help rolling out of bed every morning at 6ish to put in an hour or so at the keyboard. I’m able to keep it up anytime I have something I want to say or to figure out. If I don’t have something to say, I need the push of the productivity machine to ‘make’ me write. That’s no fun!

It’s why an artist doesn’t need motivation to do their art, but does when it comes time to make a living from it, unless sharing their art is part of doing their art. If you want to make a living with your art, you have to get to a place of loving the sharing of your art. The place of seeing that as a necessary and loving piece of the doing of your art.

The best productivity tip I can give you is: Love What You Do.

Keys to Getting Paid Well

Sell what people want to buy

Listen to your people! What questions are they asking you? What do they want from you? How do they like to work with you?

Implement some feedback you get. Now they are co-creating with you! Your offering has gone from a sales pitch to a mutual project. Now you’re cooking.

 

Communicate so your customers feel appreciated

More people leave because they feel unappreciated than for any other reason. Listen, really listen. People can tell the difference.

Listen and make changes! Now they know you heard them.

Communicate the results you will provide. Of course, they are the results your people really want.
Take the time and space to think and get comfortable with this aspect of your business

Seth Godin once said to me (and everyone else in the auditorium) “You can’t sell what you won’t buy.” You can’t sell books, ebooks, coaching, pools, cars, professional services or anything else if you won’t buy them yourself. In his story it was knives door-to-door. He bought a set and successfully sold them. His colleague didn’t buy a set and didn’t sell many. If you aren’t comfortable buying, you can’t be persuasive selling.

You have to be proud of your price. As you name your price, you have to look the other person in the eye, with your chin held high and say it right out loud. If you can’t do that, you won’t sell your goodies. Take the time to get very comfortable with your value and your price.
Get feedback from your mastermind group about your price and offering

These decisions can’t be made in a vacuum. Your mastermind group can help you with examples of others who have offered similar and how they did with their pricing.

Your mastermind group can help you get comfortable with your price. They will push you to raise your prices when the time is right. They will give you 10 reasons why you are worth what you are asking.

Who, what, how, how much?

Fill in your work sheets for this week. Think about them, talk them over with your mastermind group, tell your customers about them.

Week 4 – Getting Paid Well

This week we will examine our business model; we’ll talk about pricing and tie that in with our marketing.

Our business model is what our business is about – who we help, what results we give them, how we do it and what it costs. We clarify these things so we can test to make sure we have a market and that they want what we are offering at the price we are offering it. We look at how we deliver, what it costs and what people will pay. We test to make sure we can produce enough to make as much as we want. We look for the resources we need to make sure we can do what we say we can.

Pricing isn’t just about covering costs (although that is essential) it is an important part of our marketing. Our price tells people what kind of service we offer and it tells them whether this offering is for them.

Last week Seth Godin posted this:

Seth Godin's Circles of Marketing

 

 

What we offer is at the core of what we do. How we deliver (usability and support) is next important. Price, our story and the community of people who care are the reason we are doing what we do. The outer ring represents the tactics we use to get our story out.

Everything about how we do our business and how we market starts at the centre. We need to be passionate about what we offer; we need to care about our customers and we need to be good at what we do.

 

This week we look at what we do, for whom and how that makes us enough money. This week we look at getting paid well for what we do.